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violist

 

About

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Christina Ebersohl is an exceptional violist. She is a US Army veteran. And she is blind. But what she lacks in physical sight she makes up for with vivid musicality, technical ability, and a charismatic presence.

Currently, Christina studies with performer/composer Kenji Bunch at Portland State University, having previously studied under Oregon Symphony’s principal violist Joël Belgique.

In 2016, Christina was awarded the Gilman Scholarship, traveling to Florence, Italy, for an intensive music program to study with violist Luna Michele. She has been the recipient of a number of music scholarships, including the Debbie Boldrick Music Scholarship, the National Federation of Music Clubs Scholarship, and the Gladys C. Anderson Memorial Scholarship through the American Foundation for the Blind.

Under the guidance of pianist/composer, and Body-mapping instructor Lisa Marsh, Christina is quickly on her way to becoming the first blind Body-Mapping instructor through Andover Educators. She is dedicated to promoting wellness in performance and accessible music education for all. 

Christina has been featured on PSU’s webpage, The Oregonian, and on KOIN 6 news. Most recently, she spoke at the 2017 PDXTalks on perseverance and change in her talk “How to change a lightbulb”.

She performs an expansive range of repertoire, advocating for new compositions for the instrument. Most recently, Christina preimered Susan Alexjander’s “Ananda Sama” for solo viola and fixed recording. In 2019, she will premiere “A Weightless Moment” by LA-based composer Damen Easton Liebling.

"Christina is an amazing person…Talent alone is not enough. It's her personal history and her drive. She's inspiring…” (Joël Belgique to Tom Hallman, The Oregonian)

 

 
 

FAQ

Q:  Can I contact you to perform for my event?

A: Thanks for asking! Of course! I can perform a wide range of pieces and would be happy to tailor a program for your unique needs. Just submit a “CONTACT” form with your information and a brief message (you know…the who, what, when, where basics!) and I’ll personally get back to you!


Q: Great! Can you do anything else besides play the viola?

A: Well, I can’t juggle, if that’s what you mean. But I am also an accomplished speaker on accessibility in music education, and perseverance through hardships. If you are interested in having me speak for your event, just mention that when you submit a “CONTACT” form!


Q: What’s with this Body-Mapping stuff?

A: Body-mapping is a great tool for all musicians to have! More information can be found at the Body-mapping page. I will be liscensed in Body-Mapping by June of 2019 and will be available to give masterclasses and lectures in that subject as well.


Q: But…what IS Body-Mapping?

A: Body-Mapping is an individual’s perception and understanding of their body, how it is constructed, and how it moves. The more musicians understand and learn about their own body-maps, the more likely they are to prevent injury and surpass limitations. Seriously, check it out!


Q: So how do you learn music being blind?

A: Great question! I use a variety of different methods, from braille music notation to screen reading software that tells me what each note is to really, really good listening and memorization skills!


Q: So do you have perfect pitch?

A: I actually don’t.


Q: Did you get any superpowers after losing your sight?

A: I mean…no. But if I WAS a superhero, I could never tell you and reveal my secret identity…



in the news

 
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pdxtalks

When she started going blind five years ago, Christina Ebersohl had to learn how to do everything differently: walking, reading, listening – and her passion: playing the viola. The US Army veteran and junior at PSU’s Honors College plays in the PSU Orchestra as well as several chamber ensembles, and is now studying under the principal violist of the Oregon Symphony. For Ebersohl, personal growth comes from overcoming adversity and taking risks...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7NfRB8C_gxA


Tom hallman, the oregonian

Before she lost the sight in both eyes a few years ago, Christina Ebersohl would have easily walked down this Portland State University hallway. Now, she used a red-tipped cane, tapping walls on her way to a practice room in the university's department of music…

http://www.oregonlive.com/living/index.ssf/2017/02/tom_hallman_she_turned_to_musi.html

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Suzanne pardington, psu

After Christina Ebersohl started going blind in 2012, she had to learn how to do everything differently: walking, reading, listening — and her passion: playing the viola. At first she didn’t want to get out of bed. But she soon decided not to give up on herself or her music. She practiced viola five hours a day, learned how to walk with a cane and read braille and enrolled in Portland State’s Honors College as a music major.

https://www.pdx.edu/insidepsu/finding-her-way-christina-ebersohl


GREGORY DAY, tHE PORTLAND WEEKLY PODCAST

29-year-old Army veteran Christina Ebersohl begun losing her eyesight in Sept 2012 & was declared legally blind 2 years afterwards. She now studies under Joël Belgique, principal Violist of the Oregon Symphony...

https://player.fm/series/the-weekly-portland-podcast/violist-christina-ebersohl


I am not invisible

I Am Not Invisible is a remarkable exhibition featuring 20 portraits of Oregon women military veterans.

There are more than 28,000 women veterans in Oregon — a number that has risen steadily over the past three decades — representing almost one-tenth of Oregon’s veteran population.

And yet, women veterans continue to face significant barriers and challenges in accessing necessary health care and other services, while experiencing a lack of recognition unlike their male counterparts. By spotlighting the many faces of this diverse and important segment of the Oregon veteran community, IANI aims to increase awareness and dialogue about women veterans, as well as open viewers’ eyes to the myriad contributions, needs and experiences of women who have served in the military...

http://iani.oregondva.com/

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For the Love of Viola concert
Lincoln Performance Hall, Portland
February 17th, 2018

 
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press page

One stop shop!

 
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bio, short and sweet

Christina Ebersohl is an exceptional violist. She is a US Army veteran. And she is blind. But what she lacks in physical sight she makes up for with vivid musicality, technical ability, and charismatic presence.

In 2015, Christina was accepted to Portland State University’s music program where she has flourished. In 2016, Christina was awarded the Gilman International Study Scholarship and travelled to Florence, Italy, for an intensive music program. Currently, Christina studies with performer/composer Kenji Bunch.

Christina performs an expansive range of repertoire—from Bach to Bartok. She is also a passionate supporter of new transcriptions and compositions for the instrument. Under the guidance of pianist/composer, and Body-mapping instructor Lisa Marsh, Christina also will be the first-ever blind Body-Mapping instructor through Andover Educators.
(~125 words)

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Bio, a little braggy

Christina Ebersohl is an exceptional violist. She is a US Army veteran. And she is blind. But what she lacks in physical sight she makes up for with vivid musicality, technical ability, and a charismatic presence.

Her ambition and hard work made her an exemplary soldier, earning an Army Achievement Medal her first three months of service. She was Honorably Discharged after two years and returned home to pursue her music career. Three months later, however, Christina was rushed to the emergency room when she suddenly began to lose her sight. Over the next two years, Christina’s sight continued to quickly fade, and by early 2015, she was already legally blind.

But nothing could extinguish her spirit. In the fall of 2015, Christina was accepted to Portland State University’s music program where she continues to flourish; she was featured on Portland State’s webpage, in The Oregonian, and on KOIN 6 news. Most recently, she was a guest presenter for the 2017 PDXTalks with her speech: “How to change a lightbulb”. In the summer of 2016, Christina was awarded the Gilman International Study Scholarship and travelled to Florence, Italy, for an intensive music program, studying under talented pedagogue and performer Luna Michele. She has been the recipient of a number of music scholarships, including the Debbie Boldrick Music Scholarship, the National Federation of Music Clubs Scholarship, and the Gladys C. Anderson Memorial Scholarship through the American Foundation for the Blind. Currently, Christina studies with performer/composer Kenji Bunch, having previously studied under principal violist of the Oregon Symphony Joël Belgique.

Christina performs an expansive range of repertoire—from the classic Bach Suites to the explosive Rozsa Concerto. She is also a dedicated supporter of new transcriptions and compositions for the instrument. In February, she premiered "Ananda Sama" for solo viola and soundtrack, commissioned by Cascadia-composer Susan Alexjander. Under the guidance of pianist/composer, and Body-mapping instructor Lisa Marsh, Christina is on her way to becoming the first-ever blind Body-Mapping instructor through Andover Educators.
(~325 words)

joël belgique

"Christina is an amazing person. Talent alone is not enough. It's her personal history and her drive. She's inspiring…”
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To contact Christina about inquires, bookings, or upcoming performances, please submit a CONTACT form.